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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2019-129
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2019-129
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: regular paper 06 Sep 2019

Submitted as: regular paper | 06 Sep 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO).

Surveying pulsating auroras

Eric Grono and Eric Donovan Eric Grono and Eric Donovan
  • Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Abstract. The early morning auroral oval is dominated by pulsating auroras. This category of aurora has often been discussed as if it is just one phenomenon, but it is not. Pulsating auroras are separable based on the extent of their pulsation and structuring into at least three subcategories. This study surveyed 10 years of all-sky camera data to determine the occurrence probability for each type of pulsating aurora in magnetic local time and magnetic latitude. Amorphous pulsating aurora is found to be a nearly ubiquitous early morning aurora, and pulsating aurora is almost exclusively amorphous pre-midnight. Occurrence distributions for each type of pulsating aurora are mapped into the magnetosphere to approximately determine the location of their source regions. The patchy and patchy pulsating aurora distributions primarily map to locations approximately between 4 and 9 RE, while some amorphous pulsating aurora maps to farther distances.

Eric Grono and Eric Donovan
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Status: open (extended)
Status: open (extended)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Eric Grono and Eric Donovan
Data sets

Replication data for: Surveying Pulsating Auroras E. Grono https://doi.org/10.5683/SP2/MICSLT

Eric Grono and Eric Donovan
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Latest update: 14 Nov 2019
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Short summary
This is the first survey of pulsating aurora which is differentiated by type. Pulsating aurora is found to be a nearly ubiquitous early morning phenomenon, and it is almost entirely lacking persistent structuring before midnight. Long-lived patches which are known to move with convection primarily appear after midnight. These patches are a less common form of pulsating aurora and are found to originate from the inner magnetosphere, in agreement with past observations of their source region.
This is the first survey of pulsating aurora which is differentiated by type. Pulsating aurora...
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