Journal cover Journal topic
Annales Geophysicae Sun, Earth, planets, and planetary systems An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2018-56
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Regular paper
07 Jun 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO).
Spring and summer time ozone and solar ultraviolet radiation variations over Cape Point, South Africa
D. Jean du Preez1,2, Jelena V. Ajtić3, Hassan Bencherif4, Nelson Bègue4, and Caradee Y. Wright1,5 1Department Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa
2Research Department, South African Weather Service, Pretoria, 0181, South Africa
3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade, Bulevar oslobodjenja 18, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
4Université de La Réunion, Laboratoire de l'Atmosphère et des Cyclones, UMR 8105, 15 Avenue René Cassin, CS 92003, Saint-Denis, CEDEX, Réunion, France
5Environment and Health Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa
Abstract. The correlation between solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) and atmospheric ozone is well understood. Decreased stratospheric ozone levels which led to increased solar UV radiation levels at the surface have been recorded. These increased levels of solar UV radiation have potential negative impacts on public health. This study was done to determine whether or not the break-up of the Antarctic ozone hole has an impact on stratospheric columnar ozone (SCO) concentrations and resulting ambient solar UV-B radiation levels at Cape Point, South Africa. At Cape Point, the strongest anti-correlation on clear-sky days was found at solar zenith angle 20° with exponential fit R2 values of 0.71 and 0.66 for total ozone column and SCO, respectively. An average radiation amplification factor of 0.92 was found and the largest decrease in ozone levels occurred during September months. The MIMIOSA-CHIM model showed that the polar vortex had a limited effect on ozone levels at 435–440 K for September and 600 K over Cape Point during November. Tropical air-masses more frequently affect the study site, and this requires further investigation.
Citation: du Preez, D. J., Ajtić, J. V., Bencherif, H., Bègue, N., and Wright, C. Y.: Spring and summer time ozone and solar ultraviolet radiation variations over Cape Point, South Africa, Ann. Geophys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2018-56, in review, 2018.
D. Jean du Preez et al.
D. Jean du Preez et al.
D. Jean du Preez et al.

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Short summary
Reduced atmospheric ozone results in increased solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) at the surface which may potentially negative impact public health. We aimed to assess whether or not the break-up of the Antarctic ozone hole had an impact on ozone and UVR at Cape Point (South Africa). We found a moderate inverse relationship between ozone and UVR at midday on clear-sky days. The Antarctic ozone hole had a limited effect on ozone levels while tropical air masses more frequently affected the site.
Reduced atmospheric ozone results in increased solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) at the surface...
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