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Annales Geophysicae An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2018-118
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-2018-118
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Regular paper 15 Nov 2018

Regular paper | 15 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO).

On the radiation belt location in the 23–24 solar cycles

Alexei V. Dmitriev Alexei V. Dmitriev
  • 1Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan
  • 2Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia

Abstract. Within the last two solar cycles (from 2001 to 2018), the location of the outer radiation belt (ORB) was determined with using NOAA/Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite observations of energetic electrons with energies above 30keV. It was found that the ORB was shifted a little (~1 degrees) in the European and North American sectors while in the Siberian sector, ORB was displaced equatorward by more than 3 degrees. The displacements corresponded qualitatively to the change of geomagnetic field predicted by the IGRF-12 model. However in the Siberian sector, the shift was found to be ~2 degrees larger than that predicted by the model. The equatorward shift became prominent after 2012 that might be related to a geomagnetic jerk occurred in 2012–2013. The displacement of ORB to lower latitudes in the Siberian sector can contribute to an increase in the occurrence rate of mid-latitude auroras observed in the Eastern Hemisphere.

Alexei V. Dmitriev
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Status: open (until 04 Jan 2019)
Status: open (until 04 Jan 2019)
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Alexei V. Dmitriev
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Short summary
The Earth’s radiation belt (ERB) is formed by energetic particles caught in the geomagnetic trap. Within the last two solar cycles (from 2001 to 2018), observation of the ERB by a fleet of low-altitude POES satellites allowed to find an abnormal equatorward displacement of the outer part of ERB in the Siberian sector. The displacement can partially explain an increase in the occurrence rate of mid-latitude aurora borealis observed in the Eastern Hemisphere.
The Earth’s radiation belt (ERB) is formed by energetic particles caught in the geomagnetic...
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